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Book Red Dog

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Book Red Dog

Although this book might be considered in the "young folks" genre of the "Lassie" or "Shep" variety, Red Dog was real. Giving him a name would have been out. Clifford the Big Red Dog Book Cover 2" x 3" Fridge / Locker Magnet, Sammeln & Seltenes, Haushalt & Küche, Dekoration & Interieur. lasf5.nu - Buy Red Dog Rising - Story of a Police Bloodhound book online at best prices in India on lasf5.nu Read Red Dog Rising - Story of a Police.

Book Red Dog Beschreibung

Red Dog ist ein Kurzroman von Louis de Bernières, der das Leben eines beliebten Hundes, eines "Red Cloud Kelpie" mit dem Spitznamen Red Dog, in Karratha, Westaustralien, aufzeichnet. Ein auf dem Roman basierender Film wurde in Australien. Red Dog is a book by a writer in love. While passing through a town in the Australian outback, novelist Louis de Bernières discovered a statue of a dog. Intrigued. Although this book might be considered in the "young folks" genre of the "Lassie" or "Shep" variety, Red Dog was real. Giving him a name would have been out. Oxford Bookworms Library: Level Red Dog audio CD pack, m. Buch, m. CD-​ROM. Louis de (2) lasf5.nu Bewertung. lasf5.nu Bewertung. (1)​. lasf5.nu - Buy Red Dog Rising - Story of a Police Bloodhound book online at best prices in India on lasf5.nu Read Red Dog Rising - Story of a Police. Oxford Bookworms Library: Level Red Dog audio CD pack - Louis De Written for secondary and adult students the Oxford Bookworms Library has seven. klasse in Szene gesetzte Story nach einer wirklich wahren Begebenheit um den Red Dog. Einfach mega süss-Levi Miller als Mike, der einfach zum knuddeln.

Book Red Dog

Oxford Bookworms Library: Level Red Dog. von eBookEPUBDRM Adobe​Electronic Book Everybody should have a friend like Red Dog. klasse in Szene gesetzte Story nach einer wirklich wahren Begebenheit um den Red Dog. Einfach mega süss-Levi Miller als Mike, der einfach zum knuddeln. Red Dog ist ein Kurzroman von Louis de Bernières, der das Leben eines beliebten Hundes, eines "Red Cloud Kelpie" mit dem Spitznamen Red Dog, in Karratha, Westaustralien, aufzeichnet. Ein auf dem Roman basierender Film wurde in Australien. Zur Kasse. Anmeldung Mein Konto Merkzettel 0. Haben Uk Politik eine Frage Slot Antenna Book Produkt? Zusammenfassung Word count 7, Suitable for younger readers. Casinospiele Gratis 2: E. Über uns. Louis de Bernieres collected these stories about the life of a real dog in Western Australia.

Coenraad de Buys is a legend, a polygamist, a swindler and a big talker; a rebel who fights with Xhosa chieftains against the Boers and British; the fierce pa A blistering, brutal novel of the South African frontier from a major new literary voice Winner of four major South African prizes At the end of the eighteenth century, a giant strides the Cape Colony frontier.

Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages. Published June 6th by Pushkin Press first published October 20th More Details Original Title.

International Booker Prize Nominee for Longlist Other Editions 9. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Red Dog , please sign up. Is this historically correct? J Nee, definitief nie.

See 1 question about Red Dog…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Red Dog.

Longlisted for the Booker International Prize I started this book before the Booker International shortlist was announced, and I can understand why it missed out, but I found it rather impressive, if bloodthirsty.

The latter is hardly surprising for a book inspired by Blood Meridian. I am not going to write a long detailed review - Paul has done that already and Margitte wrote a very good one on the Afrikaans original.

Anker's protagonist is Coenrad de Buys, a real if larger than life adventu Longlisted for the Booker International Prize I started this book before the Booker International shortlist was announced, and I can understand why it missed out, but I found it rather impressive, if bloodthirsty.

Anker's protagonist is Coenrad de Buys, a real if larger than life adventurer who lived in South Africa in the late 18th and earlier 19th century. His story is wild and entertaining, and Anker borrows freely from other writers and sources.

I took a chapter or so to get used to the style - the first few pages in particular are written in a showy florid style, but it becomes quite compulsive once the action gets going.

It is a little overlong, as the skirmishes, raids and intrigues become a little repetitive, but overall Anker makes a good job of creating a multi-faceted character.

This book is a fictional rendition of the live of the the outlaw, scoundrel, frontier farmer, Coenraad De Buys. The character was taken from the footnotes of history and brought alive.

The institutionalized history, forbidding an alternative perception or interpretation, excluded characters such as Coenraad De Buys. One of the main reasons was that he was a scroundrel pioneer, who refused to be bordered in by either politics, religion or social rules.

Almost seven feet tall, born in , from Fr This book is a fictional rendition of the live of the the outlaw, scoundrel, frontier farmer, Coenraad De Buys.

Almost seven feet tall, born in , from French Huguenot parents, De Buys took up migration for the most part of his life.

He was the first white man to settle in the northern part of South Africa. He had a belligerent and obstinate personality.

He was known as a fearless,often cruel, wild man, an excellent hunter, who did not tolerated opposition of any kind.

He had several wives, none of them white, and would later become known as the father of the Buys folk.

One of his wives was a formidable Xhosa princess from a prominent family. The European colonists despised him in no uncertain terms, yet he often facilitated relationships and agreements between the bitter rivals: the Xhosas, Bushmen as well as European settlers.

Being highly intelligent, literate, as well as eloquent in three languages-Afrikaans, English and Xhosa-was unusual for the time.

He was also accused of being the instigator of many wars between the groups in the southern parts of the country. Henry Lichtenstein, who met Coenraad at least once, wrote in his Travels in Southern Africa, " His uncommon height, for he measured nearly seven feet; the strength yet admirable proportion of his limbs, his excellent carriage, the confident look of his eye, his high forehead, his whole mien, and a certain dignity in his movements, made altogether a most pleasing impression.

Such one might conceive to have been the heroes of ancient times; he seemed the living figure of a Hercules, the terror of his enemies, the hope and support of his friends.

The author brings this man's legend alive in a very objective manner, by attributing strengths and weaknesses to a man who was ignored by history, simply because he did not fit the bill of a hero as it was presented, through many generations, to the people of South Africa.

There is always the risk that the history novelist could manipulate the facts in the misguided belief that it makes the story more enjoyable to the reader.

This is dishonourable. The great challenge facing the historic fiction book writer therefore is to conduct extensive research on the subject to ensure the accuracy of the novel, and then to write it in such a manner that with a minimum of licence the reader escapes the boundaries of academia whilst enjoying a good story and a satisfying learning process at the same time.

In context it translates into modern characteristics attributed to the historical characters. For instance, homosexuality is suggested in some of the unlikely characters, while others was indeed known in history as having been homosexual.

This might have been a literary freedom taken to the extremes for the shock value. Whether it is a factual account of Coenraad De Buys, one will never know.

That it was entertaining in its brutal truth, is a fact. The objectivity lies in the fact that the circumstances in which the wars took place were described in elegant and poetic prose, but with a daring honesty, spotlighting the atrocities and barbaric cruelty of everyone involved.

Since the history of the region was already known to me, it is where we live, and I myself did extensive research about the same region, the book became a bit stale and uninspiring to finish.

It was no longer fresh or pleasant to read. Nothing new could be added after the halfway mark; it became a repetitious recollection of wars and violence, and migration, and then war and violence again.

That was, after all what Coenraad De Buys was all about. Or rather, what he was most remembered for. But he could be gentle and kind, friendly and wise, to those he trusted enough.

It was confirmed by factual letters written about this much-despised man, but this part of his personality, which had him become the king of several black tribes on a few occasions, as well as leader of many rebellious white frontier farmers, was never included in official history versions of the white 'Christian' European enclave.

What I do appreciate about the book is the research that has gone into it and the brilliant prose with which history is re-introduced to a new generation of readers.

One can only hope that young adult readers will be interested enough in our history to read the book. Books like these are essential to inform, as well as bring a new understanding, or insight, to our own paths through time and space, since it exposes the detail that was left out of the older versions of the country's tale.

It will be very hard for older readers to digest this book. Coming from the old school of thought where a particular viewpoint was presented, actually forced upon the nation, as the truth for so many generations, and to be confronted with a different one, will not be a pleasant, neither acceptable experience.

One can only hope that historical fiction writers won't rattle the cages too far, since this genre is also a form of 'live' history.

Although it is fiction and suppose to be entertaining as well, it is still regarded as another true presentation of history and truth can lose its way in a too vibrant imagination.

It is sad when that happens i. My main objection throughout my life was always the way historical figures were presented in both literature and history books.

From an early age I rebelled against the goddized, or divinified, figures presented to us as heroes. We were not allowed to view them, or even explore, any other possibilities openly.

During my research into this part of history and I am a researcher by 'trade' , I read original material from the period: letters, reports, newspapers and personal diaries and got a totally different picture as was presented to us.

For instance, the 'trekkers' who moved away from the British Rule into the African interior, brewed witblits , similar to the American moonshine; had 'lively parties' with singing and dancing around the ox wagons, molested young girls, and had illicit affairs, as well as babies, with young girls, while being 'married' to another woman.

Couples had many children before a missionary arrived that could marry them officially. It became a huge problem for missionaries meeting up with them from time to time.

I found these facts in historical diaries and could only shake my head when a well-known author used it in one of his novels. He was ostracized for blemishing the memory of the noble 'trekkers'.

He was basically banned as a personna non grata from the establishment. I, of course, knew where he found his information, since I, too, had to crawl around in dark, dampy, dusty cellars to find those diaries.

It was tough to accept that everyone was lying to us by omitting the whole story. And when it finally was possible for authors, who took a tremendous risk in doing it, to use the information, I was elated by their courage.

Authors of literary novels 'humanized' these people again and brought the welcome balance necessary to digest our own weaknesses and strengths.

They brought the color back into the stories and opened up a wealth of possibilities to young minds. I am forever grateful to them.

This book is not a laid-back, relaxing read for the reader who just want to be entertained by a good story. It will be appreciated by the more serious readers of literature.

Brink and Ettienne Van Heerden, this author writes in a genre demanding time, patience and an open mind. They were, and are, regarded as authors who grabbed the bull by the horns.

The prose was excellent, but the story itself, although informative, was rendered without high and low points, or even a thrilling element.

No excitement. However, it portrayed the everyday lives of all the people very well. One tiny element in the book that tickled me, is that a missionary had a printing press, but it is never mentioned anywhere where they got the paper from in the 'Godforsaken'African wilderness.

I am still curious. Since I was interested in the book because of the subject and the region it brought alive, I enjoyed it and I am glad that I have read it.

Other books that can be considered in this genre, based on the same region: The books of Margaret Poland - especially if you're interested in the superiority complex of the British immigrants who thought they did everyone a favor by being here.

Her books are very much subjective; James A Michener's The Covenant objective and very well researched ; Max Du Preez's Of Wariors, Lovers and Prophets - an introduction to the footnote figures in history presented in short compelling essays.

Excellent research done by the author. Another author who explored South Africa and neighboring countries and wrote mesmerizing travel journals about the history of the places he visited, is Lawrence Green.

He wrote his tales around the s to way into the s and did extensive historical research into the earlier periods. He even confirmed an unknown, and very rare, fact about my own family, which only serious researchers could have found.

This element in one of his books validated his facts, to me, at least. So yes, I am impressed with the work he has done.

However, this book, Buys - 'n grensroman Buys - a frontier novel is a welcome contribution to history as we need to know it. It could have fitted well into the American frontier literature.

There is something Cormac Mccarthy-ish to it. Yep, the brutal truth it is. View 2 comments. Aanskou my: Ek is die legende Coenraad de Buys.

Kom, laat ek jou besmet, my erflik belaste leser. As jy hier lees, sien jy wat ek sien. Behold me: I am the legend Coenraad de Buys.

Come let me contaminate you, my reader of tainted stock. If you read this, you see what I see. This is from the translation by Anne Plumptre the novel includes both the original German and a more modern translation : The representations which rumour, too much addicted to exaggeration, had given us beforehand of this extraordinary man, were corrected from the moment of his entrance.

His uncommon height, for he measured nearly seven feet; the strength, yet admirable proportion of his limbs, his excellent carriage, his firm countenance, high forehead, his whole mien, and a certain dignity in his movements, made altogether a most pleasing impression.

Such one might conceive to have been the heroes of ancient times; he seemed the living figure of Hercules, the terror of his enemies, the hope and support of his friends.

We found in him, and it was what according to the descriptions given we had little reason to expect, a certain retiredness in his manner and conversation, a mildness and kindness in his looks and mien, which left no room to suspect that he had lived several years amongsts savages, and which still more even contributed to the remove that his conversation the prejudice we had against him.

He willingly gave information concerning the objects upon which he was questioned, but carefully avoided speaking of himself and his connection with the Caffres.

This restraint, which was often accompanied with a sort of significant smile, that spoke the inward consciousness of his own powers, and which was plainly to be read that his forebearance was not the result of fear, but that he scorned to satissfy the curiosity of any one at the expense of truth, or of his own personal reputation, made him much more interesting to us, and excited our sympathy much more than it would perhaps have been excited by the relation of his story.

This novel opens up that restraint, and Buys gives us his own retrospective account of his life. He refers to his narrating self as Omni-Buys, aware of what is being written about him at the time, and also how he will be perceived by historians in our time.

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John Richardson. I felt straight away that I had to find out more about this splendid dog. A few months later I returned to Western Australia and spent two glorious weeks driving around collecting Red Dog stories and visiting the places that he knew, writing up the text as I went along.

I hope my cat never finds out that I have written a story to celebrate the life of a dog. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages.

Published October 3rd by Vintage first published February 1st More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Red Dog , please sign up. Dinosaur GG hi, the main plot is about a dog who belongs to everyone in the community of Dampier, the Pilbara.

He wonders over the country and searches for his tr …more hi, the main plot is about a dog who belongs to everyone in the community of Dampier, the Pilbara.

He wonders over the country and searches for his true owner. Why do Australians use different words to mean the same thing?

Name Because auzzies don't want us to know what they are talking about. See 2 questions about Red Dog…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3.

Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Red Dog. Plain tales, simply told, based on true stories of a dog who lived in the Pilbara area of Western Australia in the s.

Red Dog obviously touches a chord with the iron ore mining community among whom he lives: defiant, self-sufficient, obstinate, and thoroughly undomesticated, he embodies the pioneer spirit, the mongrel mentality, the sense of independence of that far-flung community.

It's funny what heroes we memorialize with statuary: Oh, and there was a film too: Funny, too, what will keep ou Plain tales, simply told, based on true stories of a dog who lived in the Pilbara area of Western Australia in the s.

It's funny what heroes we memorialize with statuary: Oh, and there was a film too: Funny, too, what will keep our little minds fairly amused while gently recuperating from a double whammy bug.

This has been on my shelves forever, if I remember right my Mum pressed it on me in return for passing on to her my copy of Corelli's Mandolin not a keeper.

Thus it didn't actually cost me anything, but I do wonder about the price that publishers will demand for something that provides no more than 90 minutes of entertainment.

View 1 comment. Sep 22, Michael rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , dog , australia. This is a piquant fictional account of a real dog in Western Australia who achieved a vibrant independent life and captured the hearts of a broad community of people.

He learned to catch rides by car and bus and expanded his range until he became known and supported over a large region. The t This is a piquant fictional account of a real dog in Western Australia who achieved a vibrant independent life and captured the hearts of a broad community of people.

The book itself is a work of art, published with thick vellum pages and beautiful evocative illustrations. Feb 12, Nancy Oakes rated it really liked it Shelves: uk-fiction.

Red Dog actually existed; the author notes in the author's note that the stories he tells in the book are all based in reality, and that all he invented were the characters.

He first came across mention of Red Dog in when he went to Perth to attend a literature festival; part of the program was that the author would make his way to Karratha, a mining town to the north.

There he came across a bronze statue of Red Dog, and wanted to find out more. To write the book, he later returned to the a Red Dog actually existed; the author notes in the author's note that the stories he tells in the book are all based in reality, and that all he invented were the characters.

He got some of his info from newspaper cuttings as well as two other books published about the dog in Australia. The book is only pages long of which the last three contain a brief glossary of Aussie terms.

I read that part first and I would advise you to do the same. The story itself isn't one long narrative, but rather short little glimpses of Red Dog's life and adventures.

Red Dog was loved by many people, didn't really have an owner, and was independent and assertive enough so that people let him have his way, and eventually, a majority of the people who came in touch with Red Dog ended up loving him.

The story is heartwarming yet a little sad at the end, but what a great story it is! To be quite honest, I don't normally like stories about animals, and I picked this up only because it was recommended to me as a choice for novels set in Australia or by Australian authors, but I ended up absolutely loving this book.

For you cat people, there are some funny bits about a cat in here. Nov 15, notgettingenough rated it did not like it Shelves: haven-t-read-but.

Haven't read, but seen the movie, upon a high recommendation. Noela, you have a lot of making up to do. I see that in the book the dog's only 'master' is half-Maori.

In the movie they have made him American, played by an actor of some note, presumably because Americans don't watch movies that don't have an American connection.

I do wish Australians and English movie-makers would stop doing that. For me it spoilt the movie, if it had been made for an Australian market, as most of those Haven't read, but seen the movie, upon a high recommendation.

For me it spoilt the movie, if it had been made for an Australian market, as most of those sorts of films are locally, I imagine it would have been a much better thing.

More like The Castle, for example, which made no effort whatsoever to appeal to non-Australians and is far superior. Jan 12, Amy rated it it was amazing Shelves: biography-autobiography-or-memoir , read-on-recommendation , satisfying.

I read this book in essentially one sitting, put it down, and heaved a huge sigh of contentment. I have two other books by this author on my "to be read" pile, but picked this one up because it was sent to me by quinnsmom.

Did you know today is her birthday? Happy, happy, chica! Anyhow, though this is simply told, I got very involved in the characters. I could relate to dogs that pass gas, cats that hiss, people that live life fully and all sorts of thing.

What I didn't expect was the full rang I read this book in essentially one sitting, put it down, and heaved a huge sigh of contentment.

What I didn't expect was the full range of emotions that this book would carry me through. There are some very sad bits, but no more than life brings us in the normal twists and turns.

I found myself thinking of Greyfriars Bobby, the dog from Edinburgh with the lovely statue Here's the Wiki entry.

Dog loyalty is a wonderful thing. And the nice thing in Red Dog's case, is that he had the love and affection of an entire community.

Anyhow, I liked this a lot, and wandered around on the net to find a picture of the statue. Aug 27, Courtney rated it really liked it.

As both a dog-lover understatement and an Aussie, how could I not love this short little tale of a dog with such character and personality and wind?

It's incredible that the author never met this dog, the way he writes about the mischief and adventures is so genuine and feels so real, like it could be your own dog or you neighbour's dog he's describing.

John was also a fantastic character, the kind of guy you'd love to be able to count amongst your close friends. The rural Australian slang w As both a dog-lover understatement and an Aussie, how could I not love this short little tale of a dog with such character and personality and wind?

The rural Australian slang was dead on and the imagery of Australia's scorching, hellish summers and diverse landscape was delightful to read.

I wanted to read this before seeing the film and I'm so glad I did. Best part? You can knock it over in a couple of hours and put it down feeling content and cheerful.

Red Dog is the 5th book by Louis de Bernieres and was inspired when de Bernieres visited the West Australian town of Karratha for a literary dinner and came across the bronze statue to Red Dog outside the town of Dampier.

As the author learned more about the dog, he formulated the novel, which is essentially an amalgamation of the anecdotes told about this much loved animal, his endearing and also his annoying habits, his ability to get under the guard of the most hardened characters, and his ev Red Dog is the 5th book by Louis de Bernieres and was inspired when de Bernieres visited the West Australian town of Karratha for a literary dinner and came across the bronze statue to Red Dog outside the town of Dampier.

As the author learned more about the dog, he formulated the novel, which is essentially an amalgamation of the anecdotes told about this much loved animal, his endearing and also his annoying habits, his ability to get under the guard of the most hardened characters, and his eventual search for the master he loved and missed and seemed determined to track down.

It is a heart-warming tale. Quite randomly grabbed this in the bookswap, and I'm very glad I did now! Although with this book, Beth has now witnessed just how much I really can sob my heart out over a book I was crying so hard by the time Bill was unable to put Red Dog down that I couldn't see anymore.

When I managed to return to the book, I barely made it through the next and last like, six pages before once more being blinded.

It makes it worse that th Quite randomly grabbed this in the bookswap, and I'm very glad I did now! It makes it worse that this was a true story and that really happened.

I hope that the men found out who was responsible and went and performed a little vigilante justice of their own. Justifiable homicide for sure.

People make me so upset sometimes, especially where animals are involved. This was in the 70s and the outback towns were small, where everyone knew each other and knew the Red Dog.

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The Private Journal of William Reynolds. William Reynolds. Red Dog was published in Afrikaans in and won six major literary prizes in South Africa.

It is his first novel to be translated into English. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

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Return to Book Page. Preview — Red Dog by Willem Anker. Red Dog by Willem Anker ,. Michiel Heyns Translator. A blistering, brutal novel of the South African frontier from a major new literary voice Winner of four major South African prizes At the end of the eighteenth century, a giant strides the Cape Colony frontier.

Coenraad de Buys is a legend, a polygamist, a swindler and a big talker; a rebel who fights with Xhosa chieftains against the Boers and British; the fierce pa A blistering, brutal novel of the South African frontier from a major new literary voice Winner of four major South African prizes At the end of the eighteenth century, a giant strides the Cape Colony frontier.

Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages. Published June 6th by Pushkin Press first published October 20th More Details Original Title. International Booker Prize Nominee for Longlist Other Editions 9.

Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Red Dog , please sign up. Is this historically correct?

J Nee, definitief nie. See 1 question about Red Dog…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters.

Sort order. Start your review of Red Dog. Longlisted for the Booker International Prize I started this book before the Booker International shortlist was announced, and I can understand why it missed out, but I found it rather impressive, if bloodthirsty.

The latter is hardly surprising for a book inspired by Blood Meridian. I am not going to write a long detailed review - Paul has done that already and Margitte wrote a very good one on the Afrikaans original.

Anker's protagonist is Coenrad de Buys, a real if larger than life adventu Longlisted for the Booker International Prize I started this book before the Booker International shortlist was announced, and I can understand why it missed out, but I found it rather impressive, if bloodthirsty.

Anker's protagonist is Coenrad de Buys, a real if larger than life adventurer who lived in South Africa in the late 18th and earlier 19th century.

His story is wild and entertaining, and Anker borrows freely from other writers and sources. I took a chapter or so to get used to the style - the first few pages in particular are written in a showy florid style, but it becomes quite compulsive once the action gets going.

It is a little overlong, as the skirmishes, raids and intrigues become a little repetitive, but overall Anker makes a good job of creating a multi-faceted character.

This book is a fictional rendition of the live of the the outlaw, scoundrel, frontier farmer, Coenraad De Buys. The character was taken from the footnotes of history and brought alive.

The institutionalized history, forbidding an alternative perception or interpretation, excluded characters such as Coenraad De Buys. One of the main reasons was that he was a scroundrel pioneer, who refused to be bordered in by either politics, religion or social rules.

Almost seven feet tall, born in , from Fr This book is a fictional rendition of the live of the the outlaw, scoundrel, frontier farmer, Coenraad De Buys.

Almost seven feet tall, born in , from French Huguenot parents, De Buys took up migration for the most part of his life.

He was the first white man to settle in the northern part of South Africa. He had a belligerent and obstinate personality. He was known as a fearless,often cruel, wild man, an excellent hunter, who did not tolerated opposition of any kind.

He had several wives, none of them white, and would later become known as the father of the Buys folk.

One of his wives was a formidable Xhosa princess from a prominent family. The European colonists despised him in no uncertain terms, yet he often facilitated relationships and agreements between the bitter rivals: the Xhosas, Bushmen as well as European settlers.

Being highly intelligent, literate, as well as eloquent in three languages-Afrikaans, English and Xhosa-was unusual for the time.

He was also accused of being the instigator of many wars between the groups in the southern parts of the country. Henry Lichtenstein, who met Coenraad at least once, wrote in his Travels in Southern Africa, " His uncommon height, for he measured nearly seven feet; the strength yet admirable proportion of his limbs, his excellent carriage, the confident look of his eye, his high forehead, his whole mien, and a certain dignity in his movements, made altogether a most pleasing impression.

Such one might conceive to have been the heroes of ancient times; he seemed the living figure of a Hercules, the terror of his enemies, the hope and support of his friends.

The author brings this man's legend alive in a very objective manner, by attributing strengths and weaknesses to a man who was ignored by history, simply because he did not fit the bill of a hero as it was presented, through many generations, to the people of South Africa.

There is always the risk that the history novelist could manipulate the facts in the misguided belief that it makes the story more enjoyable to the reader.

This is dishonourable. The great challenge facing the historic fiction book writer therefore is to conduct extensive research on the subject to ensure the accuracy of the novel, and then to write it in such a manner that with a minimum of licence the reader escapes the boundaries of academia whilst enjoying a good story and a satisfying learning process at the same time.

In context it translates into modern characteristics attributed to the historical characters. For instance, homosexuality is suggested in some of the unlikely characters, while others was indeed known in history as having been homosexual.

This might have been a literary freedom taken to the extremes for the shock value. Whether it is a factual account of Coenraad De Buys, one will never know.

That it was entertaining in its brutal truth, is a fact. The objectivity lies in the fact that the circumstances in which the wars took place were described in elegant and poetic prose, but with a daring honesty, spotlighting the atrocities and barbaric cruelty of everyone involved.

Since the history of the region was already known to me, it is where we live, and I myself did extensive research about the same region, the book became a bit stale and uninspiring to finish.

It was no longer fresh or pleasant to read. Nothing new could be added after the halfway mark; it became a repetitious recollection of wars and violence, and migration, and then war and violence again.

That was, after all what Coenraad De Buys was all about. Or rather, what he was most remembered for. But he could be gentle and kind, friendly and wise, to those he trusted enough.

It was confirmed by factual letters written about this much-despised man, but this part of his personality, which had him become the king of several black tribes on a few occasions, as well as leader of many rebellious white frontier farmers, was never included in official history versions of the white 'Christian' European enclave.

What I do appreciate about the book is the research that has gone into it and the brilliant prose with which history is re-introduced to a new generation of readers.

One can only hope that young adult readers will be interested enough in our history to read the book. Books like these are essential to inform, as well as bring a new understanding, or insight, to our own paths through time and space, since it exposes the detail that was left out of the older versions of the country's tale.

It will be very hard for older readers to digest this book. Coming from the old school of thought where a particular viewpoint was presented, actually forced upon the nation, as the truth for so many generations, and to be confronted with a different one, will not be a pleasant, neither acceptable experience.

One can only hope that historical fiction writers won't rattle the cages too far, since this genre is also a form of 'live' history.

Although it is fiction and suppose to be entertaining as well, it is still regarded as another true presentation of history and truth can lose its way in a too vibrant imagination.

It is sad when that happens i. My main objection throughout my life was always the way historical figures were presented in both literature and history books.

From an early age I rebelled against the goddized, or divinified, figures presented to us as heroes.

We were not allowed to view them, or even explore, any other possibilities openly. During my research into this part of history and I am a researcher by 'trade' , I read original material from the period: letters, reports, newspapers and personal diaries and got a totally different picture as was presented to us.

For instance, the 'trekkers' who moved away from the British Rule into the African interior, brewed witblits , similar to the American moonshine; had 'lively parties' with singing and dancing around the ox wagons, molested young girls, and had illicit affairs, as well as babies, with young girls, while being 'married' to another woman.

Couples had many children before a missionary arrived that could marry them officially. It became a huge problem for missionaries meeting up with them from time to time.

I found these facts in historical diaries and could only shake my head when a well-known author used it in one of his novels. He was ostracized for blemishing the memory of the noble 'trekkers'.

He was basically banned as a personna non grata from the establishment. I, of course, knew where he found his information, since I, too, had to crawl around in dark, dampy, dusty cellars to find those diaries.

It was tough to accept that everyone was lying to us by omitting the whole story. And when it finally was possible for authors, who took a tremendous risk in doing it, to use the information, I was elated by their courage.

Authors of literary novels 'humanized' these people again and brought the welcome balance necessary to digest our own weaknesses and strengths.

They brought the color back into the stories and opened up a wealth of possibilities to young minds. I am forever grateful to them.

This book is not a laid-back, relaxing read for the reader who just want to be entertained by a good story. It will be appreciated by the more serious readers of literature.

Brink and Ettienne Van Heerden, this author writes in a genre demanding time, patience and an open mind. They were, and are, regarded as authors who grabbed the bull by the horns.

The prose was excellent, but the story itself, although informative, was rendered without high and low points, or even a thrilling element.

No excitement. However, it portrayed the everyday lives of all the people very well. One tiny element in the book that tickled me, is that a missionary had a printing press, but it is never mentioned anywhere where they got the paper from in the 'Godforsaken'African wilderness.

I am still curious. Since I was interested in the book because of the subject and the region it brought alive, I enjoyed it and I am glad that I have read it.

Other books that can be considered in this genre, based on the same region: The books of Margaret Poland - especially if you're interested in the superiority complex of the British immigrants who thought they did everyone a favor by being here.

Her books are very much subjective; James A Michener's The Covenant objective and very well researched ; Max Du Preez's Of Wariors, Lovers and Prophets - an introduction to the footnote figures in history presented in short compelling essays.

Excellent research done by the author. Another author who explored South Africa and neighboring countries and wrote mesmerizing travel journals about the history of the places he visited, is Lawrence Green.

He wrote his tales around the s to way into the s and did extensive historical research into the earlier periods.

He even confirmed an unknown, and very rare, fact about my own family, which only serious researchers could have found.

This element in one of his books validated his facts, to me, at least. So yes, I am impressed with the work he has done. However, this book, Buys - 'n grensroman Buys - a frontier novel is a welcome contribution to history as we need to know it.

It could have fitted well into the American frontier literature. There is something Cormac Mccarthy-ish to it. Yep, the brutal truth it is. View 2 comments.

Aanskou my: Ek is die legende Coenraad de Buys. Kom, laat ek jou besmet, my erflik belaste leser.

As jy hier lees, sien jy wat ek sien. Behold me: I am the legend Coenraad de Buys. Come let me contaminate you, my reader of tainted stock. If you read this, you see what I see.

This is from the translation by Anne Plumptre the novel includes both the original German and a more modern translation : The representations which rumour, too much addicted to exaggeration, had given us beforehand of this extraordinary man, were corrected from the moment of his entrance.

His uncommon height, for he measured nearly seven feet; the strength, yet admirable proportion of his limbs, his excellent carriage, his firm countenance, high forehead, his whole mien, and a certain dignity in his movements, made altogether a most pleasing impression.

Such one might conceive to have been the heroes of ancient times; he seemed the living figure of Hercules, the terror of his enemies, the hope and support of his friends.

We found in him, and it was what according to the descriptions given we had little reason to expect, a certain retiredness in his manner and conversation, a mildness and kindness in his looks and mien, which left no room to suspect that he had lived several years amongsts savages, and which still more even contributed to the remove that his conversation the prejudice we had against him.

He willingly gave information concerning the objects upon which he was questioned, but carefully avoided speaking of himself and his connection with the Caffres.

This restraint, which was often accompanied with a sort of significant smile, that spoke the inward consciousness of his own powers, and which was plainly to be read that his forebearance was not the result of fear, but that he scorned to satissfy the curiosity of any one at the expense of truth, or of his own personal reputation, made him much more interesting to us, and excited our sympathy much more than it would perhaps have been excited by the relation of his story.

This novel opens up that restraint, and Buys gives us his own retrospective account of his life. He refers to his narrating self as Omni-Buys, aware of what is being written about him at the time, and also how he will be perceived by historians in our time.

I am omnipresent. I am Omni-Buys. You will find me in many embodiments. You will come across me as itinerant farmer and anthropologist, rebel and historian.

I am a vagabond, a book-bibber, a smuggler, lover and naturalist. I am a warrior and a liar; I am a scoundrel and a teller of my own tale.

I am going to blind you and bewilder you with my incarnations, with my omnipotent gaze. I am a bird of passage; I am the wind beneath your wings.

Stroke the small of my back and you will know I am no angel. I know you well. Longlisted for the International Booker the judges cited: " A work that reminds us how translation is a creative force that destabilises linguistic conventions.

A novel of serpentine, swashbuckling sentences that capture the mounting cruelty of the colonial project in South Africa. As he plunders mission stations and cattle kraasls, so he plunders the texts of others far and wide in order to tell his tale.

Should you then stumble across the remains of other authors, notably Samuel Beckett and Cormac McCarthy, regard it as the homage of a scoundrel.

In a fascinating game of translation tennis, the passages concerned were first translated into Afrikaans by the author, then translated back into English by the translator without referring to the originals.

Personally, I think it is a clever device. The passages concerned don't particularly standout from the rest of the prose, so it isn't that the author is as the TLS review rather suggests leaning on the quality of McCarthy's prose.

Although it would have been nice to have the passages highlighted in the afterword to aid the reader, and I suspect there must be similar, yet to be spotted, clever borrowings from Beckett.

Indeed, as is always the case with messages that have to travel too far, the French slogans have a totally different look when they arrive, scurvy-ridden and scuffed, in Graaf Rijnet.

Perhaps we can also chop off a few heads. The devil take equality and fraternity. But liberty sounds like a good idea.

But if anything Buys's controversial nature arises from the way he treats all equally - no more a friend of the white settlers than those who have been there longer.

Having largely lived with the Xhosa during the s, he returns to live with the settlers in the first decade of the s, but becomes estranged from them when he testifies against a woman who mistreated her slave.

These shifting alliances are getting even more dangerous, ever more distrusted by both factions. But on this day at the end of the eighteenth century, I can still survive in the interregnum.

The English title comes from a pack of wild dogs that follow Buys around for years, originally led by a one-eared red dog Buys himself bit-off the other ear in a confrontation when he was 12 years old.

My one major reservation with the novel however, concerns the more micro-level plot. The author - or perhaps Omni-Buys - has carefully researched each historic mention or documentary piece of evidence about Buys' life.

View all 4 comments. Surely they can only get better from here on out? Indeed, when I started reading but before I looked up the author, I instantly got Blood Meridian vibes, with the main character Coenraad de Buys bringing to mind the terrifying Judge Holden.

Red Dog is a grim, brutal, bloody fictional biography of Buys, a real figure from 18th century South Africa, and really just not my cup of tea at all.

Literature should be challenging, yes, and not sugarcoat or romanticise brutal historic events and usually I have quite a high tolerance for reading about various atrocities.

But something about this book just wore me down and the repetition left me feeling restless and even bored at times. As a translation, however, it is fairly impressive.

Michiel Heyns has translated it from the Afrikaans but kept a lot of the language to really transport the reader to the scene as much as you might not want to be there.

The tone is very cold, which serves well to emphasise the brutality of Buys and his life. I think I would have appreciated learning about this particular period of South African history in a non-fiction account, or even just from a different perspective.

View 1 comment. Set at the birth of South Africa in the late s this is the story of Coenraad de Buys; a brigand and survivor, a rapist and a wedded family man with numerous wives and children, a colonist and yet a fugitive, but above all, a revolutionary and a hero.

He is a larger than life character, even at seven feet tall, and very much the centre of this epic tale, pushing those interact with him to bit parts - perpetually followed as he rides by packs of wild dogs.

Its part novel, part historical accoun Set at the birth of South Africa in the late s this is the story of Coenraad de Buys; a brigand and survivor, a rapist and a wedded family man with numerous wives and children, a colonist and yet a fugitive, but above all, a revolutionary and a hero.

Reflected in the story is the violence of a country in which life was gruesome, lawless, bestial and short.

May 05, Kamil rated it it was ok Shelves: , historical-fiction , owned-books , owned-read. Red Dog by Willem Anker translated from Afrikaans by Michel Heyns is a merciless, sanguinary novel that vividly captures the cruelty of the colonial project in late 18th and early 19th century South Africa.

The novel brims with violence, bloodshed and human ruthlessness, and showcases the toxic masculinity that, in many ways, remains a key feature of South African society.

Zusammenfassung Sh Bwin De count 7, Suitable for younger readers. E-Books MP3. Neuerscheinungen Bücher Filme Musik Games. B2B-Services für. CHF Beschreibung Informationen zur Titelgruppe: Wahre Geschichten um einen Hund, der im westlichen Australien umherzog und nie einen Besitzer hatte. Red Dog was a Red Cloud kelpie, an Australian sheepdog.

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